Ethiopia Pledges Big Role In Red Sea Security

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Rear Admiral Nasir Abadga, a representative of the Ethiopian Naval Force Chief Commander, said that members of the navy have been carrying out the mission assigned to them “at any place and time” and are playing a major role in strengthening Ethiopia’s “honor by taking countermeasures against anti-peace forces.”

The Ethiopian National Defense Forces (ENDF) quoted Rear Admiral Nasir as saying that the navy and army members “are more prepared than usual for any mission.”

He further said that Ethiopia’s defense forces are “a force of peace” who live with the people and “give their lives for the peace of the country and its people”. Building a strong navy by adapting to new military technologies as required by the time and is “a continuous task.”

Rear Admiral Nasir further highlighted that by strengthening Ethiopia’s “internal unity” and by using “military and scientific knowledge to build a modern, professional army that can be integrated with the times”, the navy should work together to bring about a tangible change that can increase “the current fighting capacity” of the country.

By distancing themselves from “rumors that disintegrate the country and unsettle the people” members of the navy should do their part in “all the activities to ensure the transfer of knowledge and technology.”

Because the army has performed its national and constitutional duties with calm and sacrifices, it has made Ethiopia “proud” and its enemies walk in shame, he said, and cautioned that the navy, too, should “prepare ourselves adequately for any duty assigned to us.”

The dispatch by the ENDF did not mention the occasion in which Rear Admiral Nasir spoke to members of the navy.

Although Ethiopia is still a landlocked country, it has been organizing a navy force for the past five years.

In June last year, Ethiopia has graduated several members trained in various professional fields, including in Navigation, Engineering, Electricity, Communication and Armament Department for two years.

On 01 January, Ethiopia signed a “historic” Memorandum of Understanding (MoU” with Somaliland to “secure access to the sea and diversify its access to seaports.”

Despite objections from the government of Somalia in Mogadishu, the Somaliland Ministry for Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation said this week that Somaliland is “on course without any wavering, and remain seized” of the implementation of the MoU, and said that it has appointed a technical team, team of international legal experts and a high level advisory group to advise and guide the process.

 

Addis Standard